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WWU President Sabah Randhawa explains … cricket

WWU President Sabah Randhawa explains … cricket


You know if you look at Cricket, it actually
is mostly played by the commonwealth countries. It was brought to the subcontinent by the
Brits and it took on a popularity that if you see the cricket matches particularly in
India or Pakistan or Sri Lanka, it’s as if you are watching FIFA, you know the final
soccer game, 100,000 people and people are just totally going through the roof.
When I was in Pakistan, in Lahore, in December, the weekends early in the morning there is
no traffic which is great, but it is bad because everyone is playing cricket in the roads,
and trying to get a car through so the ball doesn’t hit or you don’t hit someone becomes
a real painful process. (laughs) So the three ways you can score is, so you
have a ground and basically in sort of baseball which is more of one end of the ground this
in the center and there is either a circle or an oval field around it. And basically
there are two ends, two wickets as they call it, and there are at any given time two batsmen,
so you can hit the ball in any part of the field and as long as it is not caught you
can run between those two wickets. You can run singles, you can just run crossover, or
you can run multiple times, but both of the batsman need to be safe, they need to be at
the wickets when the ball arrives. The other way is you hit it and it crosses the boundaries
of the field along the ground and that’s a 4. Or you hit it and it crosses the boundaries
without touching it, and it goes over and that’s a 6.
In the pure form cricket is a 5-day game and I would say in a day-and-a-half, if a team bats,
you would expect them to score about 500 to 600 runs and after 5 days I should say that
the result could be a draw … meaning that neither team has won. You would have two teams
play a five-match series, so they play 5 matches in a series, all draws. No results achieved
in any of those matches. And that is OK, it is the process that matters, not the end result.
(laughs)

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